Fla. university debuts new 25T magnet

2011 07 14 09 12 05 967 25 T Magnet 225

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University has unveiled a new custom-built $2.5 million split-magnet imaging system that features a 25-tesla magnet.

Interior parts of the split-coil magnet were tested and retested to ensure the magnet's structural integrity. Image courtesy of Florida State University.Interior parts of the split-coil magnet were tested and retested to ensure the magnet's structural integrity. Image courtesy of Florida State University.
Interior parts of the split-coil magnet were tested and retested to ensure the magnet's structural integrity. Image courtesy of Florida State University.
Florida researchers believe the system could revolutionize scientific research in a variety of fields, because high magnetic fields are able to observe certain atoms or molecules or exhibit properties that are difficult to visualize under less extreme conditions.

Researchers cut large holes in the midplane of the magnet to provide user access to the bore but maintain a high magnetic field, all while supporting 500 tons of pressure pulling the two halves of the magnet together. At the same time, the system carries 160,000 amps of electrical current and 3,500 gallons of water per minute to flow through the midplane to prevent overheating.

The National Science Foundation funded the magnet, with development led by Jack Toth of the Magnet Science and Technology staff.

The magnet's first user, a scientist from Kent State University in Ohio, has already begun conducting experiments with the technology.

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