By Erik L. Ridley, AuntMinnie staff writer
November 9, 2015

Our next destination on the Road to RSNA is a stop in healthcare IT for a preview of this year's presentations on reporting, critical results management, speech recognition, and radiation dose monitoring software.

Radiation dose monitoring is a particularly hot topic this year. Several researchers will describe success with various initiatives, including a real-time tracking display in the reading room to provide radiologists with immediate dose alerts; a software program that calculates organ dose from CT; and dose monitoring software for optimizing the ratio between radiation dose and image quality in a breast screening program.

Other presentations will, for example, highlight how dose monitoring software can help reduce pediatric x-ray dose and how cloud-based software offers potential for monitoring CT radiation dose across multiple institutions.

A number of presentations at RSNA 2015 will also explore ways to improve the quality and utility of the radiologist's main product -- the radiology report. Researchers will share the following insights: Orthopedic surgeons prefer structured reports for musculoskeletal MRI studies, hedging statements in reports can affect patient follow-up, and internal medicine physicians have different opinions than radiologists on the quality of their reports.

Other groups will report on how both radiologists and referring physicians benefit from multimedia reports, how natural-language processing technology can evaluate the "mood" of reports, and how structured reporting paves the way for epidemiological analysis.

In line with initiatives to increase the visibility of radiologists, researchers will explore ideas for being more directly involved with patients, including sharing how patients would appreciate the opportunity to review their imaging studies directly with imaging experts. One study also reported success in providing screening mammography results to patients within minutes of the exam being completed.

Not surprisingly, activity is also increasing in the area of clinical decision support (CDS) software. One group found that a pilot implementation was helpful in rolling out CDS, while another research team reported that adopting the software did not drive referrers away.

In other notable HIT research, two studies will show how setting up alerts on electronic medical record (EMR) software can help identify and manage patients at risk for allergies or nephrotoxicity from contrast media.

Those making the trip to Chicago will also appreciate how HIT is increasingly being deployed to enhance radiologist education. Efforts include developing a Web-based image viewer to provide interactive teaching files, a dashboard application to prepare residents for taking call, a new online teaching file for practicing reading head CT cases, and -- fittingly in today's social media era -- utilizing hashtags to enhance resident analytics.

See below for previews of these and other healthcare IT-related scientific papers and posters at this year's RSNA meeting. Of course, these are just a sample of the content on offer; a host of refresher courses and educational exhibits also await those who make the trip to the Windy City. For more information on those talks, as well as other abstracts in this year's scientific and educational program, click here.

If you haven't already, please also check out our related Road to RSNA Imaging Informatics Preview for our coverage of PACS, analytics, mobile devices, and image sharing. Our Advanced Visualization section on Tuesday will highlight 3D and computer-aided detection (CAD) topics.

Scientific and Educational Presentations
Cloud-based app brings teaching files to the Web
Sunday, November 29 | 11:05 a.m.-11:15 a.m. | SSA11-03 | Room S403A
In this scientific session, a team from the University of Maryland will highlight its application for providing access to interactive teaching files on the Web with full PACS functionality.
Dashboard preps residents for on-call duty
Sunday, November 29 | 11:25 a.m.-11:35 a.m. | SSA11-05 | Room S403A
Researchers from Georgetown University will present a dashboard application designed to help prepare radiology residents for the types of cases they can expect to see while taking call.
#NotJustForTwitter: Hashtags improve resident analytics
Sunday, November 29 | 11:35 a.m.-11:45 a.m. | SSA11-06 | Room S403A
A team from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) will describe how adding qualitative and sharing features such as hashtags significantly enhanced resident performance analytics at HUP.
Structured reporting enhances resident education
Sunday, November 29 | 11:55 a.m.-12:05 p.m. | SSA11-08 | Room S403A
Another team from the University of Pennsylvania will share how adopting structured reporting can be useful for educating and training radiology trainees.
Real-time tracking display quickly spots dose issues
Sunday, November 29 | 12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m. | IN102-ED-SUA8 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 8
In this poster presentation, a team from Vancouver General Hospital will describe how its real-time radiation dose display helps radiologists stay on top of patient dose management.
Structure may limit utility of decision support
Sunday, November 29 | 12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m. | IN201-SD-SUA2 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 2
In this poster presentation, a Henry Ford Hospital research team will discuss how the need for referring physicians to provide structured information to clinical decision-support software can be a limiting factor in its performance.
Discussion of on-call mistakes helps residents
Sunday, November 29 | 12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m. | QS100-ED-SUA1 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 1
University of Chicago researchers will report on how reviewing and discussing reading mistakes can improve the on-call performance of radiology residents.
Internists may have different view on radiology reports
Sunday, November 29 | 12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m. | QS102-ED-SUA2 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 2
Based on their experience with a quality improvement project, researchers from William Beaumont Hospital found that improving the quality of radiology reports is sometimes easier said than done.
Analysis aids communication about retained foreign objects
Sunday, November 29 | 12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m. | QS106-ED-SUA4 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 4
Researchers from the University of Chicago will share in this poster how they were able to almost completely eliminate retained foreign surgical objects at their institution.
Algorithm assists reading of diffusion-weighted images
Sunday, November 29 | 1:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m. | IN207-SD-SUB1 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 1
In this poster session, a Brazilian research team will share how a color-coding algorithm can make it easier to interpret diffusion-weighted MRI studies.
New teaching file module helps users practice head CT
Sunday, November 29 | 1:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m. | IN213-SD-SUB7 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 7
Danish radiology resident Dr. Jens Borgbjerg plans to introduce a new teaching file module designed to help radiology trainees develop a search plan for interpreting head CT studies.
Radiomics helps predict patient survival in lung cancer
Monday, November 30 | 11:50 a.m.-12:00 p.m. | SSC06-09 | Room S402AB
Combining radiomics -- large-scale quantitative analysis of imaging features -- with clinical and genomic data can improve the prognostic power of survival prediction models in lung cancer patients, according to this scientific paper.
Workflow optimization speeds up fMRI scan times
Monday, November 30 | 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. | QS112-ED-MOA3 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 3
In this poster presentation, a Stanford University research team will share how optimizing workflow led to sharp reductions in scanning time for functional MRI (fMRI) studies.
Patients would like more interaction with radiologists
Monday, November 30 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | HP212-SD-MOB2 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 2
A group from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that most patients -- and their referring physicians -- would appreciate reviewing their studies with imaging experts.
Personal touch matters with referring physicians
Monday, November 30 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | QS005-EB-MOB | Lakeside Learning Center, Hardcopy Backboard
In-person communication between subspecialty radiologists and acute care surgeons can significantly affect patient care, according to this study from the University of Michigan.
Analysis speeds up CT scans for walk-in stroke patients
Monday, November 30 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | QS109-ED-MOB1 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 1
Another Stanford University group will detail its success in decreasing the delay from when walk-in patients receive a stroke code in the emergency department until they are scanned with CT.
EMR features can bolster contrast safety efforts
Monday, November 30 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | QS115-ED-MOB4 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 4
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will describe how they used features in their electronic medical record (EMR) software to identify and manage patients at risk for allergies or nephrotoxicity from contrast media.
Worried CDS will drive referrers away? Don't be
Monday, November 30 | 3:30 p.m.-3:40 p.m. | SSE12-04 | Room S102D
Do you wonder if referring physicians will react to clinical decision-support (CDS) systems by sending their patients elsewhere? This Monday afternoon session may allay your fears.
Structured reports are better for shoulder MRI
Tuesday, December 1 | 11:00 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | SSG08-04 | Room S402AB
A team from the University of Munich in Germany will show that structured reporting for shoulder MRI studies is more complete, takes less time, and is more helpful to orthopedic surgeons for decision-making.
Patient follow-up rates may fall if radiologists hedge
Tuesday, December 1 | 11:20 a.m.-11:30 a.m. | SSG08-06 | Room S402AB
In this scientific session, researchers from the University of Washington and Philips Healthcare will describe how hedge statements by radiologists can influence the rate of patients who do not receive recommended follow-up.
Structured reporting enables epidemiological analysis
Tuesday, December 1 | 11:30 a.m.-11:40 a.m. | SSG08-07 | Room S402AB
A German research team will show in this presentation how adopting structured reporting technology can pave the way for epidemiological analysis.
Multimedia reports link tumor measurements to key image
Tuesday, December 1 | 11:50 a.m.-12:00 p.m. | SSG08-09 | Room S402AB
A team from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and Carestream Health will demonstrate how both radiologists and oncologists benefit from multimedia radiology reports that include hyperlinks to annotated tumor measurements on CT images.
Patients want breast screening results right away
Tuesday, December 1 | 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. | QS009-EB-TUA | Lakeside Learning Center, Hardcopy Backboard
A University of Utah team will share its success in providing screening mammography results to patients just a few minutes after studies are finished.
Processing technique can detect 'mood' of reports
Tuesday, December 1 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | IN238-SD-TUB6 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 6
In this poster presentation, a group from Philips Healthcare and the University of Chicago will describe a metric for objectively evaluating the certainty level of radiology reports.
Pilot project raises awareness of decision support
Tuesday, December 1 | 3:00 p.m.-3:10 p.m. | SSJ13-01 | Room S402AB
In this Tuesday session, a team from Yale University will describe its experience with a pilot implementation of clinical decision support.
Software tallies radiation dose to organs from CT
Wednesday, December 2 | 10:30 a.m.-10:40 a.m. | SSK16-01 | Room S404AB
A team from the U.S. National Cancer Institute will unveil a computer program that can calculate radiation dose to organs from CT studies.
Medical students benefit from simulated imaging CDS
Wednesday, December 2 | 10:50 a.m.-11:00 a.m. | SSK10-03 | Room S102D
An educational portal application that simulates clinical decision support (CDS) for medical students when they order imaging studies appears to have value, according to researchers from Baylor College of Medicine.
Dose monitoring app boosts breast imaging acquisition
Wednesday, December 2 | 11:20 a.m.-11:30 a.m. | SSK16-06 | Room S404AB
In this Wednesday session, an Italian team will discuss how a dose monitoring software application integrated into a RIS can optimize the ratio between radiation dose and image quality in a breast screening program.
Structured reporting app helps residents with breast MRI
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. | IN240-SD-WEA2 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 2
Researchers from Santa Clara Valley Medical Center have found that a Web-based structured reporting application helps residents conform to the BI-RADS lexicon in their breast MRI reports.
Cloud-based software monitors CT radiation dose data
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. | PH266-SD-WEA5 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 5
Researchers from Germany plan to present cloud-based software being used to automatically monitor dose-related data from CT scanners at their institution.
EHR alert aids management of CT contrast allergy
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. | QS007-EB-WEA | Lakeside Learning Center, Hardcopy Backboard
In this poster session, researchers from the University of Minnesota and Hennepin County Medical Center will share how setting up an alert in their electronic health record (EHR) software led to more consistent premedication practices for patients with allergies to CT contrast.
Analysis cuts no-show rate at breast imaging center
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. | QS128-ED-WEA3 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 3
A team from Stony Brook University will detail its success in significantly decreasing the patient no-show rate at a breast imaging center.
Google Analytics helps enhance Image Gently website
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | PD236-SD-WEB2 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 2
In this poster presentation, a group from Duke University will share how the use of Google Analytics helped target improvements for the Image Gently website.
Call center brings together primary care, radiology
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | QS127-ED-WEB2 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 2
Canadian researchers will share their experience with 1-800-Imaging, a call center pilot project designed to form partnerships between primary care providers and medical imaging.
Speech recognition macro tackles critical results
Wednesday, December 2 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | QS129-ED-WEB3 | Lakeside Learning Center, Station 3
In this poster presentation, a team from NYU School of Medicine will discuss how adding a smart phrase, or macro, to its speech recognition system led to a significant improvement in critical results reporting and documentation.
Global survey uncovers HIS security risks
Thursday, December 3 | 10:50 a.m.-11:00 a.m. | SSQ11-03 | Room S403A
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have found hundreds of unprotected HL7 servers worldwide, presenting an alarming security risk for patient information stored on these hospital information systems (HIS).
Application enables dose, image quality evaluations
Thursday, December 3 | 11:00 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | SSQ11-04 | Room S403A
A Japanese group will describe a Web-based image evaluation application for an institutional certification system being established in Japan for low-dose CT lung cancer screening.
Dose monitoring tackles variability in pediatric x-ray
Thursday, December 3 | 11:10 a.m.-11:20 a.m. | SSQ11-05 | Room S403A
In this scientific session, a Spanish team will emphasize how dose monitoring software can facilitate radiation dose reduction for conventional radiography studies in pediatric patients.
Open-source software aids radiation dose tracking
Thursday, December 3 | 11:30 a.m.-11:40 a.m. | SSQ11-07 | Room S403A
A team from Harvard Medical School will describe the performance of its CT dose and protocol management system, which was developed based on open-source software.
EMR integration revamps DEXA reporting
Thursday, December 3 | 12:45 p.m.-1:15 p.m. | QS016-EB-THB | Lakeside Learning Center, Hardcopy Backboard
In this poster presentation, researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will share how they streamlined the process of reporting dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) studies by exporting data to the electronic medical record (EMR).