Erik Ridley

Erik is senior editor at AuntMinnie.com and focuses on coverage of artificial intelligence and imaging informatics. He joined the website in 2000 and has 24 years of radiology journalism experience, including previous stints with Diagnostic Imaging magazine, Diagnostic Imaging Scan newsletter, and PACS and Networking News. Erik holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Connecticut.

Articles by this author
When should breast cancer survivors discontinue mammo?
January 28, 2021 -- Older breast cancer survivors who have less than five years of life expectancy should no longer undergo routine surveillance mammography -- even if they have a history of high-risk cancers, according to new guidelines published online January 28 in JAMA Oncology by a multidisciplinary panel.  Discuss
EHR integration gives patients better access to images
January 27, 2021 -- Integrating a dedicated patient image portal with the portal for an electronic health record (EHR) can significantly increase the number of patients who access their medical images, according to a case study published online January 23 in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.  Discuss
3D printing may help to uncover secrets of AAOCA
January 27, 2021 -- 3D printing may be able to help in stratifying risk and making surgical decisions for patients with anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries (AAOCA), one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in children, according to research published online January 21 in Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine.  Discuss
3D T2 maps enhance assessment of myocarditis on MRI
January 25, 2021 -- A free-breathing, 3D whole-heart T2 MRI mapping sequence can efficiently and reproducibly quantify myocardial T2 times in patients with suspected myocarditis, and potentially even detect more cases of cardiac inflammation than standard 2D T2 maps, according to research published online January 19 in Radiology.  Discuss
AI enhances performance of CT lung cancer screening
January 22, 2021 -- Combining artificial intelligence (AI) with Lung-RADS can sharply increase specificity in low-dose CT lung cancer screening programs without hurting sensitivity, according to a January 19 study in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.  Discuss
PET identifies tau's origin in Alzheimer's disease
January 21, 2021 -- An automated PET image analysis method can track the development of tau protein clumps in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, revealing an important clue in how the devastating disease could potentially be treated, according to research published online January 20 in Science Translational Medicine.  Discuss
AI, radiomics predicts prostate cancer recurrence
January 19, 2021 -- A diagnostic model that incorporates artificial intelligence (AI) analysis of radiomics features on multiparametric MRI can predict the likelihood of prostate cancer recurrence prior to surgical treatment, enabling preoperative risk stratification of patients, according to research published in the January issue of EBioMedicine.  Discuss
Radiomics, AI can guide NSCLC treatment decisions
January 15, 2021 -- Radiomics and artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to guide treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without the need for a biopsy, according to research presented January 13 at the American Association for Cancer Research Virtual Special Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Diagnosis, and Imaging.  Discuss
CT radiomics classifies small nodules found in CT lung screening
January 15, 2021 -- A machine-learning algorithm can be highly accurate for classifying very small lung nodules found in low-dose CT lung screening programs, according to a poster presentation at this week's American Association for Cancer Research Virtual Special Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Diagnosis, and Imaging.  Discuss
Could AI lower malpractice risk for physicians?
January 12, 2021 -- Although some legal scholars believe that liability concerns could hinder adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) software in personalized medicine, a new study published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that physicians who follow the technology's advice may actually be shielded from malpractice liability.  Discuss