UCLA group cuts unnecessary x-rays for pelvic trauma
September 11, 2015 -- A group from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) was able to slash the number of unnecessary stat portable pelvic radiography studies that were being performed in addition to CT scans for trauma patients, according to an article in the September issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.
Cardiac cath shows risk of spasms at coronary stenoses
September 8, 2015 -- Japanese researchers using coronary angiography discovered that patients with spasms near sites of coronary stenosis had a higher risk of experiencing a heart attack in the future, according to an article in the September 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
From coins to knives: Foreign bodies run the gamut
September 3, 2015 -- A patient presenting with a foreign body -- an object that has been swallowed, breathed in, or inserted -- is a common scene in the emergency room (ER). And radiologists are just the experts to coach ER doctors on how to diagnose these patients, according to a review published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.
Fukushima nuclear disaster casts shadow on CR images
August 27, 2015 -- Radiologists at a Japanese hospital were baffled when dark spots began appearing on computed radiography (CR) images in March 2011. They discovered that the spots were caused by fallout from the nuclear disaster at the nearby Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, according to an article in the American Journal of Roentgenology.
AAOS: Some radiation during pregnancy is acceptable
August 7, 2015 -- Doctors must heed basic precautions when using imaging to diagnose traumatic injury in pregnant women, but diagnostic imaging scans are safe when used properly, according to a new report in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
Portable x-ray tops list of near-miss errors in radiology
August 4, 2015 -- A new study of near-miss errors in radiology has found that portable chest radiography was the modality with by far the largest number of close calls related to either wrong-patient or wrong-dictation mistakes, according to results published in the August issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
Lung x-rays predict mortality in MERS patients
July 2, 2015 -- A new study of Saudi Arabian patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) found that a simple method of scoring pathology on lung radiographs can be used to predict which patients are at risk of dying, according to an article in the American Journal of Roentgenology.
Safety-net hospital lifts the lid on child abuse
April 29, 2015 -- Fresh data about suspected cases of abuse show that about a quarter of children evaluated at an inner city hospital by means of a skeletal survey with radiography were found to be the victims of abuse. Furthermore, of the abused children, around 39% had skeletal trauma and 61% did not.
Radiation dose issues climb agenda in Middle East
April 22, 2015 -- New research from Dubai, United Arab Emirates, reveals how the region is targeting ever-optimized dosage in imaging and how dose awareness is becoming of greater importance within the radiological community.
Super-sized display reduces dose in angio procedures
April 20, 2015 -- Could radiation dose in angiography procedures be reduced by simply using a larger display to view images? That's the suggestion of a prototype study published in the April edition of the American Journal of Roentgenology from a researcher at Johns Hopkins University.